“Protect” Adventures

“Protect” is a very broad category, so be creative: Frodo’s mission to destroy the Ring was partly a “Protect” adventure!

Roll to see what you’re protecting, and then roll to determine the kind of protection required.

“What Are We Protecting?”

Roll 3d6.  (Need a die roller?)

3-8 A valuable object, or a collection of valuable objects. E.g. a diamond necklace, a shipment of goods, a ship’s cargo – or whatever works for you!
9-10 A person.   E.g. the Duke, a merchant, an aging wizard, the town drunk – or whatever works for you!
11-12 A group of people. E.g. villagers, travelers, pilgrims, a caravan, members of an oppressed group – or whatever works for you!
13-18 A place.   E.g. a village, a sacred grove, a fortress; the king’s treasury; the town jail – or whatever works for you!

 

What Sort of Protection Do They Need?”

Roll 3d6.  (Need a die roller?) Simply re-roll inappropriate results – e.g., you can’t really “Guide” a “Place”…

We have to…

3-7 …guide it/them through the wilderness. See the rules for Journey Length, on this page. The adventure will involve making Navigation and Survival rolls as described in the Journeys chapter. Remember to add extra penalties for the newly enlarged size of the group, for hauling wagons, carrying loads, and so on, as appropriate!
8 …guard it/them against thievery. See the rules for Duration of Service, on this page. To see if the party manages to discover the thieves, roll against the average Per of the group, at a penalty equal to Peril. Every PC may do one thing beforehand to take precautions such as setting traps, casting Watchdog spells, etc. Resolve these as complementary rolls to the main Per roll. When caught, the thieves shouldn’t be too hard to fight: if the Peril is 1-3, use N Cutpurses (Dungeon Fantasy 15 pp. 10-11); if the Peril is higher, use N+Peril-4 Thieves (Dungeon Fantasy 1, p. 12).
9-10 …escort it/them during travel. See the rules for Journey Length, on this page.
11-12 …defend it/them against attacks. See the rules for Duration of Service, on this page. The attackers should be built as standard encounters for the relevant level of Peril.
13 guide it/them through the wilderness while guarding them against thievery.
14 guide it/them through the wilderness while serving as their escort.
15 guard it/them against thievery while escorting them during travel.
16-18 guide it/them through the wilderness while serving as their escort and guarding them against thievery.

How Long Are We Protecting This?
Signing on to protect something usually means agreeing to protect it either for a period of time or until the end of a journey. How long that is, is determined by your previous roll on the “How Far Do We Have To Go?” Table, as follows:

Duration of Service for “Guard” and “Defend”
These adventures are always close by, and require no travel; instead, your roll on the “How Far Do We Have To Go?” Table indicates the length of time you need to guard or defend the thing in question.

Journey Length for “Guide” and “Escort”
If your roll on the “How Far Do We Have To Go?” Table indicates that the adventure is Here or Nearby, then the Journey starts from that location. Roll 1d6 to see how long the Journey itself is: 1-3 Far Away; 4-6 Very Far Away.

If your roll indicates that the adventure is Far Away or Very Far Away, then the Journey begins from wherever you currently are and then extends for the indicated distance.

When Do The Attacks/Robberies Occur?
To determine if and when an attack or robbery occurs, divide either the Duration of Service or the Length of the Journey (as appropriate) into a Peril number of equal segments. Each segment, roll 3d6, adding one for each attack that has already occurred. On a 12 or less, an attack occurs.

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